Some Favorite Route 66 Photochrome Postcards

Hi-Line Motel
The Hi-Line Motel in Ashfork, Arizona, began as the Hi-Line Modern Motor Court in 1936 and had Shell gasoline pumps underneath a covered canopy that extended forward from the small central building seen here. The gas pumps were later removed and the building became an office and residence. The Hi-Line Modern Court was listed in Jack Rittenhouse's "A Guidebook to Highway 66" from 1946. The Hi-Line Motel has been closed for a number of years now. (Dexter 17444-C)

Copper Cart
The Copper Cart in Seligman, Arizona, is a throw-back to the sixites even today. Opened in 1950, this restaurant has been the best spot in town to eat ever since. The classic signboard is well-lit at night, the Lion Club met here at one time, and the automobiles are from the late 1950s or the 1960s. The Copper Cart is still open on old Highway 66 in downtown Seligman but the building has been re-painted in rather garish colors. (Fromske 59814)

El Trovatore Motel
There are many photochrome postcards of the El Trovatore motel in Kingman, Arizona, but I chose this postcard view because it shows the steel tower where the notable "EL TROVATORE" sign is located. John Miller opened this motel in 1939 with 30 rooms and it was listed in both my 1939 AAA "Directory" as well as in Jack Rittenhouse's "A Guidebook to Highway 66" from 1946. Success brought an additional 46 rooms and a restaurant. When the Interstate highway looped around Kingman to the north, the El Trovatore began a long slide into secondary service and local rentals. It underwent a partial restoration and a number of rooms are again open for overnight guests. (Norman Mead - No Number)

Gypsy Garden Court
The Gypsy Garden Court in Kingman, Arizona, was built in the 1930s and has a typical arrangement for a very early Southwest motor court. The buildings fit in a U shape and encircle a gasoline station, a common arrangement for early motor courts but virtually non-existent today. (Guests do not want to listen to service station activity well into the night which apparently they tolerated back then.) The Gypsy Garden Court was listed in both my 1939 AAA "Directory" as well as Jack Rittenhouse's "A Guidebook to Highway 66" from 1946. The automobiles seen here date this postcard back to the late 1940s. The Gypsy Garden Court became the Coronado Court and ultimately was razed. (Dexter 38230)